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With the calendar flipping to June the dog days of summer will be here before we know it. That means it’s getting hot out there, and wind workers need to take precautions to maintain a safe working environment.

According to OSHA, many people are exposed to heat on the job, in both indoor and outdoor heat environments. Operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources (e.g., sunlight, hot exhaust), high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical activities have a high potential for causing heat-related illness.

Heavy sweating, dizziness, thirst and muscle spasms are just a few of the warning signs that you are experiencing a heat-related illness. When working in hot temperatures, it’s important to focus on prevention strategies:

  • Do start your workday hydrated. Start your hydration the night before.
  • Do use the buddy system. Act quickly if a co-worker shows signs of illness.
  • Don’t ignore the warning signs.
  • Don’t think heat-related illness won’t happen to you!

The AWEA EHS O&M Working Group created three awareness materials to help workers best understand the signs of heat-related illnesses and how to prevent them. Available online, materials include a reference card, training module, and a heat awareness and tracking plan. These materials will help you understand all the signs of heat-related illness, how to prevent them, and what to do if you are experiencing any of the symptoms.

Stay cool, stay hydrated, and stay safe!

Wind industry to hold Argentina Wind Power in Buenos Aires, 4-5 September

  • Argentina Windpower (AWP2019) will be organised by the Global Wind Energy Council, Camara Eolica Argentina, and Grupo La Nacion
  • AWP2019 will bring together international and Argentinian wind energy manufacturers, power producers and investors, authorities, and large energy consumers in the largest event of its kind in Argentina
  • AWP2019 reflects fast growth of the wind energy industry in Argentina, which has become one of leading sources of investment in the economy and the fastest growing sources of energy.

Buenos Aires, 4 June – The global wind industry will hold Argentina Wind Power, a major conference and exposition in Buenos Aires on 4-5 June 2019.

The event, which will be the largest of its kind to be held in Argentina, is being organised by the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), Camara Eolica Argentina and Grupo La Nacion.

It will bring together manufacturers, power producers and developers, large energy consumers, and government authorities and other institutions to discuss the continued development of the fast growing Argentinian wind energy industry, which has become one of the largest sources of investment in the Argentinian economy and the fastest growing energy source.

“Argentina has some of the best wind resources in the world, and it’s been exciting to see how fast the industry has grown over the last few years,” says Ben Backwell, CEO of GWEC. “Argentina Wind Power is going to play a key role in enabling further growth as this industry matures and goes from strength to strength.”

“The Argentinian Wind Energy Chamber is very proud to be organizing an international event like this along with GWEC. It’s important that all the actors in this growing sector are able to meet together to discuss the future of this vital new industry for Argentina,” says René Vaca Guzmán, President of the Argentina Wind Energy Chamber (CEA)

Argentina Wind Power Will take place at the Universidad Catolica Argentina in Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires on 4-5 September.

 

About GWEC 

GWEC is a member-based organization that represents the entire wind energy sector. The members of GWEC represent over 1,500 companies, organizations and institutions in more than 80 countries, including manufacturers, developers, component suppliers, research institutes, national wind and renewables associations, electricity providers, finance and insurance companies. 

 

For more information, please contact: 

CEA – Alfredo Bernardi

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La Nacion – Daniela Valleta

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La Nacion – Ignacio Turín

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GWEC – Alyssa Pek

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Phone +32 490 56 89 31

“Argentina has some of the best wind resources in the world, and it’s been exciting to see how fast the industry has grown over the last few years,” says Ben Backwell, CEO of GWEC. “Argentina Wind Power is going to play a key role in enabling further growth as this industry matures and goes from strength to strength.”

Ben Backwell, CEO of GWEC

More action needed on global gender equality by 2030

 

The 2019 SDG Gender Index, tracking gender equality across 129 countries, finds that nearly 40 per cent of the world’s girls and women – 1.4 billion people – live in countries failing on gender equality.

Another 1.4 billion people live in countries that were scored a “barely pass” on gender equality benchmarks, which include availability of gender budgeting, access to public services, equal representation in positions of power, gender pay gaps and prevalence of gender-based violence. According to the report, there is room for improvement globally: No country in the world has yet reached the “last mile” on achieving gender equality.

As shown in the graphic below, the highest-scoring countries are in Europe, North America and the Asia-Pacific region. Nordic nations (Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway) and the Netherlands made up the top five scoring countries, with Slovenia, Germany, Canada, Ireland and Australia rounding out the top 10 countries. Sub-Saharan Africa has the most number of countries among the lowest rank for gender equality.

Even among the highest-ranking countries, the following areas still garnered low scores, indicating areas for improvement among leaders of gender equality. Clearly, the intersection of gender equality and a clean energy transition provides ground for both challenges and opportunities in sustainable development:

Climate change preparedness

  • The extent to which a country is committed to disaster risk reduction;
  • Level of climate vulnerability;

Earning power and benefits

  • Tax revenue as a % of GDP;
  • Social expenditure as a % of GDP;
  • Extent to which a national budget is broken down by factors such as gender, age, income, or region;
  • Openness of gender statistics;
  • Wage equality between women and men for similar work;

Equal representation in positions of power

  • Percentage of seats held by women on a country’s Supreme Court or highest court;
  • Proportion of seats held by women in national parliaments;
  • Proportion of ministerial/senior government positions held by women;
  • Proportion of women in science and technology research positions;

Infrastructure and safety

  • Proportion of women who report being satisfied with the quality of roads in the city or area where they live;
  • Percentage of women aged 15+ who report that they “feel safe walking alone at night in the city or area where you live.”

Globally, according to report author Equal Measures 2030, a civil society partnership tracking progress on the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the average progress on achieving SDG7 for access to affordable, reliable, modern and sustainable energy is more positive than on SDG5 for gender equality. Both SDG5 and SDG7 are driving principles for the Women in Wind program.

The full report, which includes individual country rankings and recommendations for actions, is available here