Shell, EDF To Build 1.5 GW US Offshore Windfarm

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The EDF Group, through Atlantic Shores Offshore Wind (Atlantic Shores), a 50-50 joint venture between its subsidiary EDF Renewables and Shell New Energies US LLC., announces that it has been awarded a 1.5 GW offshore wind farm project off the coast of New Jersey, USA. The New Jersey Board of Public Utilities awarded the winner of the project.

The future wind farm is located between 10-20 miles off the coast of New Jersey. This offshore wind farm will be one of the most powerful in the United States and will be able to supply enough to power 700,000 homes every year. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2024.

Atlantic Shores will join forces with a wind turbine manufacturer to build a nacelle assembly facility, which is expected to create thousands of permanent jobs. The project will also invest in New Jersey’s leading institutions of higher learning to train students for new careers in the offshore wind industry.

The EDF Group is a major player in the offshore wind industry, with a portfolio of 6.5 GW of projects in operation, under construction or under development worldwide, including 2 GW in France, where it is the leader. It is also active in this sector, in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Belgium, Germany, China, and now in the United States, where its subsidiary EDF Renewables has been operating for over 20 years. It owns 6 GW of mainly onshore wind and solar assets in operation and under construction.

Jean-Bernard Lévy, Chairman and CEO of the EDF Group, said: “We are very proud to have won this major 1.5 GW project in the State of New Jersey, the first EDF offshore wind project in the United States. This success confirms the quality and competitiveness of our offer and I would like to commend the work carried out over the past several months by our teams, in partnership with Shell New Energies. This project is a significant step forward in the Group’s CAP 2030 strategy, which aims to double its installed renewable capacity worldwide between 2015 and 2030 to 60 GW net.”

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